African American Men's Wellness Study
Protocol: STUDY00003024
Full Title
Role of social determinants of health on access to bariatric surgery among African American men
Description
We are looking for African American/Black or White men to participate in a research study. The purpose of the study is to learn more about health and wellness in these groups of people.

This study will involve either an in-person interview (about 60 minutes) or an mobile survey (about 20 minutes). You can pick which option you want to participate in. The interview will be done in a private location that is convenient to you (such as a church or community center). The mobile survey can be done from your own computer or mobile device. Your answers will be kept confidential.

Compensation is available.

For questions, contact the study staff by email at bewellbuffalo@gmail.com or call/text (716) 424-8109.

Technical Description

Obesity is a major risk factor for many chronic conditions and is associated with tremendous burden on the society. Current guidelines recommend metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) for patients with BMI40 or between 35 and 40 with obesity-related comorbidities and resistant to clinical interventions. Evidence demonstrates that MBS can reduce prevalence and severity of hypertension, diabetes, renal disease and others comorbid conditions. African American (AA) patients are twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes and more than 3 times as likely to suffer from kidney failure as White patients. Although AA men have a high prevalence of obesity, they are the least likely group to receive MBS, trailing behind all other groups including AA women. Our preliminary study and other research have demonstrated that extremely obese (BMI40) AA men constitute only 2.2% of MBS patients but 13% of the extremely obese population. Adjusting for age and comorbidities, this translates into AA men being at least 6 times less likely to receive MBS compared to AA women or White patients. This study will use semi-structured patient interviews and mobile surveys to address the following Specific Aims:
(1) Explore whether and how intrinsic (acceptance, preference for, and beliefs about MBS) and extrinsic barriers (referral rate, employment, health insurance, educational attainment, access to primary care, place of residence, mental health and family status) impact access to MBS (referral for consultation and odds of undergoing surgery) among AA men;
(2)Test feasibility and acceptability of recruiting AA men into a study about MBS and weight-related complications using various recruitment strategies.
Findings from this pilot study will provide insights to inform future research on reducing disparity in obesity management tailored to AA men and development of new culturally appropriate and population-wide interventions to overcome barriers to evidence-based cost-effective management of obesity and comorbid illnesses.
Compensation: Yes
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Compensation may include cash, checks, gift cards, debit cards, or incentives like gift baskets, technology items, or merchandise.
Eligibility
Adult men ages 18+.
Men who identify as Black/African American or White.
A body mass index of 35 or higher (you can calculate your BMI here: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/english_bmi_calculator/bmi_calculator.html or contact the study staff)
Diagnosed with at least 2 of these 3 conditions: type 2 diabetes, hypertension or chronic kidney disease.
Age Group: Adults
Principal Investigator: AARON HOFFMAN
Contact(s)
AJAY ANAND MYNENI
ajayanan@buffalo.edu
+1 716-829-2975
Want to Learn More?
Let us know how the study team can reach you. If you do not hear back within 2 business days, reach out to the study team directly at the contact information above or email ctsiresearch@buffalo.edu and someone will assist you.