Study for People Having Dental Surgery
Protocol: STUDY00002662
Full Title
DUSP-1 in Sexual Dimorphism in Periodontitis
Description
This study enrolls people who are having dental surgery where some gum tissue is removed. The purpose of this study is to understand why there are differences between males and females in how severe gum disease is.

This study will collect a small sample of gum tissue to analyze that would normally discarded during your dental procedure. All procedures are considered usual care for removal of gum tissue associated with your dental care. Study takes place at the School of Dental Medicine on UB's South Campus.

Compensation is available.

Technical Description

(CSR#180797612983) The project laboratory has established that p38/MKP-1 signaling axis is critical in chronic inflammation and periodontal disease progression. In addition, MKP-1/DUSP1 signaling has been shown to be vital to attenuate MAPK-induced cytokine expression at the post-transcriptional level through mRNA interaction with RNA binding proteins. Considerable data supports the role of MKP-1 signaling to negatively regulate innate immune cytokine expression during inflammatory responses. For this clinical component of an awarded grant, we hypothesize that MKP-1 is a critical signaling pathway during periodontal disease progression and the gene promoter is hypermethylated and silenced in a sex-dependent manner. It is anticipated that these exploratory studies will deepen our understanding of sexual dimorphism of the innate immune response through MKP-1 signaling
Compensation: Yes
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Compensation may include cash, checks, gift cards, debit cards, or incentives like gift baskets, technology items, or merchandise.
Eligibility
Adults ages 18+ People having dental surgery at UB's School of Dental Medicine
Age Group: Children
Principal Investigator: Keith Kirkwood
Contact(s)
Keith Kirkwood
klkirk@buffalo.edu
+1 716-829-2844
Want to Learn More?
Let us know how the study team can reach you. If you do not hear back within 2 business days, reach out to the study team directly at the contact information above or email ctsiresearch@buffalo.edu and someone will assist you.